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The Physics Teacher
written by Vincent P. Coletta, Jeffrey A. Phillips, and Jeffrey J. Steinert
Many teachers administer a force concept test such as the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) to their students in an effort to evaluate and improve their instructional practices. It has been commonly assumed that looking at class normalized gains allows teachers to compare their courses with other courses. In this paper we present evidence to suggest that the use of class normalized gains alone may not provide a complete picture. We argue that student reasoning ability should also be assessed before between-course comparisons can be made. Assessment of reasoning ability is also useful in identifying students who are at risk. In the following we shall concentrate on the FCI, but we think our conclusions probably apply to physics concept tests generally.
The Physics Teacher: Volume 45, Issue 4, Pages 235-238
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Classical Mechanics
- General
Education - Basic Research
- Achievement
- Assessment
= Instruments
- Cognition
= Cognition Development
- Research Design & Methodology
= Data
= Validity
- Sample Population
= Age
- Student Characteristics
= Skills
General Physics
- Scientific Reasoning
- Lower Undergraduate
- High School
- Reference Material
= Research study
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© 2007 AIP Publishing
DOI:
10.1119/1.2715422
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created February 24, 2022 by Adrian Madsen
Record Updated:
April 22, 2022 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
March 12, 2007
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Record Link
AIP Format
V. Coletta, J. Phillips, and J. Steinert, , Phys. Teach. 45 (4), 235 (2007), WWW Document, (https://doi.org/10.1119/1.2715422).
AJP/PRST-PER
V. Coletta, J. Phillips, and J. Steinert, Why You Should Measure Your Students' Reasoning Ability, Phys. Teach. 45 (4), 235 (2007), <https://doi.org/10.1119/1.2715422>.
APA Format
Coletta, V., Phillips, J., & Steinert, J. (2007, March 12). Why You Should Measure Your Students' Reasoning Ability. Phys. Teach., 45(4), 235-238. Retrieved October 1, 2023, from https://doi.org/10.1119/1.2715422
Chicago Format
Coletta, V, J. Phillips, and J. Steinert. "Why You Should Measure Your Students' Reasoning Ability." Phys. Teach. 45, no. 4, (March 12, 2007): 235-238, https://doi.org/10.1119/1.2715422 (accessed 1 October 2023).
MLA Format
Coletta, Vincent, Jeffrey A. Phillips, and Jeffrey J. Steinert. "Why You Should Measure Your Students' Reasoning Ability." Phys. Teach. 45.4 (2007): 235-238. 1 Oct. 2023 <https://doi.org/10.1119/1.2715422>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Vincent Coletta and Jeffrey A. Phillips and Jeffrey J. Steinert", Title = {Why You Should Measure Your Students' Reasoning Ability}, Journal = {Phys. Teach.}, Volume = {45}, Number = {4}, Pages = {235-238}, Month = {March}, Year = {2007} }
Refer Export Format

%A Vincent Coletta %A Jeffrey A. Phillips %A Jeffrey J. Steinert %T Why You Should Measure Your Students' Reasoning Ability %J Phys. Teach. %V 45 %N 4 %D March 12, 2007 %P 235-238 %U https://doi.org/10.1119/1.2715422 %O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article %A Coletta, Vincent %A Phillips, Jeffrey A. %A Steinert, Jeffrey J. %D March 12, 2007 %T Why You Should Measure Your Students' Reasoning Ability %J Phys. Teach. %V 45 %N 4 %P 235-238 %8 March 12, 2007 %U https://doi.org/10.1119/1.2715422


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The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

The AJP/PRST-PER presented is based on the AIP Style with the addition of journal article titles and conference proceeding article titles.

The APA Style presented is based on information from APA Style.org: Electronic References.

The Chicago Style presented is based on information from Examples of Chicago-Style Documentation.

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