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written by Lisa S. Blackwell, Kali H. Trzesniewski, and Carol Dweck
Two studies explored the role of implicit theories of intelligence in adolescents' mathematics achievement. In Study 1 with 373 7th graders, the belief that intelligence is malleable (incremental theory) predicted an upward trajectory in grades over the two years of junior high school, while a belief that intelligence is fixed (entity theory) predicted a flat trajectory. A mediational model including learning goals, positive beliefs about effort, and causal attributions and strategies was tested. In Study 2, an intervention teaching an incremental theory to 7th graders (N=48) promoted positive change in classroom motivation, compared with a control group (N=43). Simultaneously, students in the control group displayed a continuing downward trajectory in grades, while this decline was reversed for students in the experimental group.
Child Development: Volume 78, Issue 1, Pages 246-263
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Pedagogy
Education - Basic Research
- Achievement
- Learning Theory
- Sample Population
= Age
- Student Characteristics
= Ability
= Skills
- Middle School
- Reference Material
= Research study
PER-Central Types Intended Users Ratings
- Curriculum
- Curriculum / Research Instrument
- Researchers
- Professional/Practitioners
- Administrators
- Educators
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© 2007 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
DOI:
4139223
Keywords:
expectancy value theory, intelligence theory, middle school research, motivational theory, neuroplasticity
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created June 29, 2022 by Lauren Bauman
Record Updated:
July 25, 2022 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
January 1, 2007
ComPADRE is beta testing Citation Styles!

Record Link
AIP Format
L. Blackwell, K. Trzesniewski, and C. Dweck, , Child Dev 78 (1), 246 (2007), WWW Document, (http://www.jstor.org/stable/4139223).
AJP/PRST-PER
L. Blackwell, K. Trzesniewski, and C. Dweck, Implicit Theories of Intelligence Predict Achievement across an Adolescent Transition: A Longitudinal Study and an Intervention, Child Dev 78 (1), 246 (2007), <http://www.jstor.org/stable/4139223>.
APA Format
Blackwell, L., Trzesniewski, K., & Dweck, C. (2007, January 1). Implicit Theories of Intelligence Predict Achievement across an Adolescent Transition: A Longitudinal Study and an Intervention. Child Dev, 78(1), 246-263. Retrieved September 25, 2022, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/4139223
Chicago Format
Blackwell, L, K. Trzesniewski, and C. Dweck. "Implicit Theories of Intelligence Predict Achievement across an Adolescent Transition: A Longitudinal Study and an Intervention." Child Dev. 78, no. 1, (January 1, 2007): 246-263, http://www.jstor.org/stable/4139223 (accessed 25 September 2022).
MLA Format
Blackwell, Lisa S., Kali H. Trzesniewski, and Carol Dweck. "Implicit Theories of Intelligence Predict Achievement across an Adolescent Transition: A Longitudinal Study and an Intervention." Child Dev 78.1 (2007): 246-263. 25 Sep. 2022 <http://www.jstor.org/stable/4139223>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Lisa S. Blackwell and Kali H. Trzesniewski and Carol Dweck", Title = {Implicit Theories of Intelligence Predict Achievement across an Adolescent Transition: A Longitudinal Study and an Intervention}, Journal = {Child Dev}, Volume = {78}, Number = {1}, Pages = {246-263}, Month = {January}, Year = {2007} }
Refer Export Format

%A Lisa S. Blackwell %A Kali H. Trzesniewski %A Carol Dweck %T Implicit Theories of Intelligence Predict Achievement across an Adolescent Transition: A Longitudinal Study and an Intervention %J Child Dev %V 78 %N 1 %D January 1, 2007 %P 246-263 %U http://www.jstor.org/stable/4139223 %O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article %A Blackwell, Lisa S. %A Trzesniewski, Kali H. %A Dweck, Carol %D January 1, 2007 %T Implicit Theories of Intelligence Predict Achievement across an Adolescent Transition: A Longitudinal Study and an Intervention %J Child Dev %V 78 %N 1 %P 246-263 %8 January 1, 2007 %U http://www.jstor.org/stable/4139223


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