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Journal of College Science Teaching
written by Randy Moore and Philip Jensen
Students in an introductory biology course who were given open-book exams during the semester earned significantly higher grades on these exams, but significantly lower grades on the closed-book final exam, than students who took in-class, closed-book exams throughout the semester. Exam format was also associated with changes in academic behavior; students who had upcoming open-book exams attended fewer lectures and help sessions and submitted fewer extra-credit assignments than students who had upcoming closed-book exams. These results suggest that open-book exams diminish long-term learning and promote academic behaviors that typify lower levels of academic achievement.
Journal of College Science Teaching: Volume 36, Issue 7, Pages 46-49
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Education - Basic Research
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© 2007 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created July 7, 2022 by Lauren Bauman
Record Updated:
August 18, 2022 by Caroline Hall
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when Cataloged:
January 1, 2007
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AIP Format
R. Moore and P. Jensen, , J. Coll. Sci. Teaching 36 (7), 46 (2007), WWW Document, (https://www.jstor.org/stable/42992504).
AJP/PRST-PER
R. Moore and P. Jensen, Do Open-Book Exams Impede Long-Term Learning in Introductory Biology Courses?, J. Coll. Sci. Teaching 36 (7), 46 (2007), <https://www.jstor.org/stable/42992504>.
APA Format
Moore, R., & Jensen, P. (2007, January 1). Do Open-Book Exams Impede Long-Term Learning in Introductory Biology Courses?. J. Coll. Sci. Teaching, 36(7), 46-49. Retrieved September 25, 2022, from https://www.jstor.org/stable/42992504
Chicago Format
Moore, Randy, and Philip Jensen. "Do Open-Book Exams Impede Long-Term Learning in Introductory Biology Courses?." J. Coll. Sci. Teaching. 36, no. 7, (January 1, 2007): 46-49, https://www.jstor.org/stable/42992504 (accessed 25 September 2022).
MLA Format
Moore, Randy, and Philip Jensen. "Do Open-Book Exams Impede Long-Term Learning in Introductory Biology Courses?." J. Coll. Sci. Teaching 36.7 (2007): 46-49. 25 Sep. 2022 <https://www.jstor.org/stable/42992504>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Randy Moore and Philip Jensen", Title = {Do Open-Book Exams Impede Long-Term Learning in Introductory Biology Courses?}, Journal = {J. Coll. Sci. Teaching}, Volume = {36}, Number = {7}, Pages = {46-49}, Month = {January}, Year = {2007} }
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%A Randy Moore %A Philip Jensen %T Do Open-Book Exams Impede Long-Term Learning in Introductory Biology Courses? %J J. Coll. Sci. Teaching %V 36 %N 7 %D January 1, 2007 %P 46-49 %U https://www.jstor.org/stable/42992504 %O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article %A Moore, Randy %A Jensen, Philip %D January 1, 2007 %T Do Open-Book Exams Impede Long-Term Learning in Introductory Biology Courses? %J J. Coll. Sci. Teaching %V 36 %N 7 %P 46-49 %8 January 1, 2007 %U https://www.jstor.org/stable/42992504


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