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The Physics Teacher
written by Amy D. Robertson, Lisa M. Goodhew, Rachel E. Scherr, and Paula R. L. Heron
Among the student ideas about forces discussed in the literature, perhaps the most commonly reported is the notion of an impetus force, or the "belief that there is a force inside a moving object that keeps it going and causes it to have some speed." For example, Clement asked university students taking introductory mechanics to draw a free-body diagram for a coin that has been tossed upward. He found that students often drew an arrow in the direction of the coin's motion, at a point midway between the initial toss and the turnaround point, sometimes providing reasoning that suggested that the arrow corresponds to a "force from your hand" or the "force of the throw." Clement interpreted these responses as indicating that "student[s] may believe that continuing motion implies the presence of a continuing force in the same direction, as a necessary cause of the motion." As another example, in a study conducted with undergraduate students at Johns Hopkins University, McCloskey, Caramazza, and Green asked students to draw the path a ball will follow after it exits the curved tubes pictured in Fig. 1. The authors found that students often drew curved trajectories for the ball exiting each tube, and they coined the term "curvilinear impetus principle" to describe students' reasoning. They write that students reasoned as though "an object constrained to move in a curved path acquires a curvilinear impetus that causes it to continue in a curved trajectory for some time after the constraints on its motion are removed." We analyzed students' responses using a resources theoretical framing, emphasizing context-sensitivity of student thinking in physics. Our aim in this paper is to make plausible that impetus-like ideas can be thought of as continuous with Newtonian physics, a theoretical argument driven by data.
The Physics Teacher: Volume 59, Issue 3, Pages 185-188
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Format:
text/html
Access Rights:
Limited free access
Restriction:
© 2021 AIP Publishing
DOI:
10.1119/10.0003660
NSF Numbers:
DGE-1256082
DUE-1608510
DUE-1608221
DUE-1914572
DUE-1914603
Keywords:
Resource Theory, free-body diagram, mental models, pendulum, schema, sense making
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created May 17, 2023 by Sam McKagan
Record Updated:
May 19, 2023 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
March 1, 2021
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Record Link
AIP Format
A. Robertson, L. Goodhew, R. Scherr, and P. Heron, , Phys. Teach. 59 (3), 185 (2021), WWW Document, (https://doi.org/10.1119/10.0003660).
AJP/PRST-PER
A. Robertson, L. Goodhew, R. Scherr, and P. Heron, Impetus-Like Reasoning as Continuous with Newtonian Physics, Phys. Teach. 59 (3), 185 (2021), <https://doi.org/10.1119/10.0003660>.
APA Format
Robertson, A., Goodhew, L., Scherr, R., & Heron, P. (2021, March 1). Impetus-Like Reasoning as Continuous with Newtonian Physics. Phys. Teach., 59(3), 185-188. Retrieved June 23, 2024, from https://doi.org/10.1119/10.0003660
Chicago Format
Robertson, A, L. Goodhew, R. Scherr, and P. Heron. "Impetus-Like Reasoning as Continuous with Newtonian Physics." Phys. Teach. 59, no. 3, (March 1, 2021): 185-188, https://doi.org/10.1119/10.0003660 (accessed 23 June 2024).
MLA Format
Robertson, Amy, Lisa M. Goodhew, Rachel Scherr, and Paula R. L. Heron. "Impetus-Like Reasoning as Continuous with Newtonian Physics." Phys. Teach. 59.3 (2021): 185-188. 23 June 2024 <https://doi.org/10.1119/10.0003660>.
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@article{ Author = "Amy Robertson and Lisa M. Goodhew and Rachel Scherr and Paula R. L. Heron", Title = {Impetus-Like Reasoning as Continuous with Newtonian Physics}, Journal = {Phys. Teach.}, Volume = {59}, Number = {3}, Pages = {185-188}, Month = {March}, Year = {2021} }
Refer Export Format

%A Amy Robertson %A Lisa M. Goodhew %A Rachel Scherr %A Paula R. L. Heron %T Impetus-Like Reasoning as Continuous with Newtonian Physics %J Phys. Teach. %V 59 %N 3 %D March 1, 2021 %P 185-188 %U https://doi.org/10.1119/10.0003660 %O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article %A Robertson, Amy %A Goodhew, Lisa M. %A Scherr, Rachel %A Heron, Paula R. L. %D March 1, 2021 %T Impetus-Like Reasoning as Continuous with Newtonian Physics %J Phys. Teach. %V 59 %N 3 %P 185-188 %8 March 1, 2021 %U https://doi.org/10.1119/10.0003660


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Impetus-Like Reasoning as Continuous with Newtonian Physics:

Is By The Same Author and Covers a Similar Topic As Impetus-Force-Like Drawings May Be Less Common Than You Think

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