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written by Mark Eichenlaub and Edward F. Redish
This resource is a section from the book Mathematics in Physics Education, released in 2019 by Springer International Publishing. For physicists, equations are about more than computing physical quantities or constructing formal models; they are also about understanding. The conceptual systems physicists use to think about nature are made from many different resources, formal and not, working together and inextricably linked. By blending mathematical forms and physical intuition, physicists breathe meaning into the equations they use, and this process is fundamental to what it means for an expert to understand something. In contrast, in physics class, novice students often treat mathematics as only a calculational tool, isolating it from their rich knowledge of the physical world. We are interested in cases where students break that pattern by reading, manipulating, and building equations meaningfully rather than purely formally. To find examples of this and explore the diversity of ways students combine formal and intuitive resources, we conducted problem-solving interviews with students in an introductory physics for life sciences class. During the interviews, students' reasoning strategies were scaffolded to elicit both formal and intuitive reasoning. We used the analytic framework of epistemic games to model how students used the strategies and how they accessed problem-solving resources, and we present evidence that novice students using these strategies accessed more expert-like conceptual systems than those typically described in problem-solving literature.

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Book Title: Mathematics in Physics Education
Pages 127-151
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Learning Environment
- Pedagogy
= Multidisciplinary
- Professional Development
Education - Basic Research
- Cognition
= Cognition Development
= Cognitive Conflict
- Learning Theory
= Cognitive Modeling
= Representations
- Problem Solving
= Expert-Novice Comparisons
= Frameworks
= Metacognition
= Representational Use
General Physics
- Scientific Reasoning
Other Sciences
- Mathematics
- Professional Development
- Lower Undergraduate
- Reference Material
= Report
PER-Central Type Intended Users Ratings
- PER Literature
- Educators
- Professional/Practitioners
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- Researchers
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Formats:
text/html
application/pdf
Access Rights:
Available for purchase
Restriction:
© 2019 Springer Nature
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-030-04627-9_6
ISBN Number:
978-3-030-04626-2
Keywords:
epistemology, knowledge construction, knowledge synthesis, mathematics integration, schema, sense making
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created May 18, 2023 by Sam McKagan
Record Updated:
June 13, 2023 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
July 2, 2019
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Record Link
AIP Format
M. Eichenlaub and E. Redish, , in Mathematics in Physics Education (2019), p. 127, WWW Document, (https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04627-9_6).
AJP/PRST-PER
M. Eichenlaub and E. Redish, Blending Physical Knowledge with Mathematical Form in Physics Problem Solving, in Mathematics in Physics Education (2019), p. 127, <https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04627-9_6>.
APA Format
Eichenlaub, M., & Redish, E. (2019). Blending Physical Knowledge with Mathematical Form in Physics Problem Solving (pp. 127-151). In Mathematics in Physics Education (1, 127). Retrieved May 27, 2024, from https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04627-9_6
Chicago Format
Eichenlaub, Mark, and Edward F. Redish. "Blending Physical Knowledge with Mathematical Form in Physics Problem Solving." In Mathematics in Physics Education. 1 ed. 127. 2019. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04627-9_6 (accessed 27 May 2024).
MLA Format
Eichenlaub, Mark, and Edward F. Redish. "Blending Physical Knowledge with Mathematical Form in Physics Problem Solving." Mathematics in Physics Education. 1 ed. 2019. 127-151. 2 July 2019. 27 May 2024 <https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04627-9_6>.
BibTeX Export Format
@incollection{ Author = "Mark Eichenlaub and Edward F. Redish", Title = {Blending Physical Knowledge with Mathematical Form in Physics Problem Solving}, BookTitle = {Mathematics in Physics Education}, Edition = {1}, Pages = {127-151}, Month = {July}, Year = {2019} }
Refer Export Format

%A Mark Eichenlaub %A Edward F. Redish %T Blending Physical Knowledge with Mathematical Form in Physics Problem Solving %B Mathematics in Physics Education %D July 2, 2019 %P 127-151 %U https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04627-9_6 %O 1 %O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Book Section %A Eichenlaub, Mark %A Redish, Edward F. %D July 2, 2019 %T Blending Physical Knowledge with Mathematical Form in Physics Problem Solving %B Mathematics in Physics Education %P 127-151 %7 1 %8 July 2, 2019 %@ 978-3-030-04626-2 %U https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04627-9_6


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Blending Physical Knowledge with Mathematical Form in Physics Problem Solving:

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