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International Journal of Science Education
written by Keith Taber
Some literature reports how learners' alternative ideas in science may be coherent, stable and theory-like. However, other commentators suggest that the available data supports the view that children's thinking is inconsistent, with elicited notions being piecemeal, ad hoc and deeply situated in specific contexts. This is considered to reflect the fragmentary and unscientific nature of the learner's knowledge. Accumulating evidence from in-depth work with individual learners is beginning to show that models of cognitive structure that can usefully inform teaching may need to be more complex than either of these views admit. Evidence from a case study is presented to show how a learner may simultaneously hold several alternative explanatory schemes, each of which is persistent over time and applied coherently across a wide range of overlapping contexts. It is argued that the manifold nature of learners' conceptions may be a key to modelling conceptual development.
International Journal of Science Education: Volume 22, Issue 4, Pages 399-417
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education - Basic Research
- Cognition
General Physics
- Physics Education Research
Other Sciences
- Chemistry
- Middle School
- Elementary School
- Informal Education
- Reference Material
= Research study
PER-Central Type Intended Users Ratings
- PER Literature
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application/pdf
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Available by subscription
Restriction:
© 2000 Taylor and Francis Group
Additional information is available.
DOI:
10.1080/095006900289813
Keywords:
Chemical Bonding, Chemistry, Cognitive Structures, Concept Formation, Higher Education, Octet Rule
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created July 14, 2005 by Lyle Barbato
Record Updated:
November 28, 2005 by Vince Kuo
Last Update
when Cataloged:
April 1, 2000
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Record Link
AIP Format
K. Taber, Int. J. Sci. Educ. 22 (4), 399 (2000), WWW Document, (https://doi.org/10.1080/095006900289813).
AJP/PRST-PER
K. Taber, Multiple Frameworks?: Evidence of manifold conceptions in individual cognitive structure, Int. J. Sci. Educ. 22 (4), 399 (2000), <https://doi.org/10.1080/095006900289813>.
APA Format
Taber, K. (2000, April 1). Multiple Frameworks?: Evidence of manifold conceptions in individual cognitive structure. Int. J. Sci. Educ., 22(4), 399-417. Retrieved January 19, 2022, from https://doi.org/10.1080/095006900289813
Chicago Format
Taber, Keith. "Multiple Frameworks?: Evidence of manifold conceptions in individual cognitive structure." Int. J. Sci. Educ. 22, no. 4, (April 1, 2000): 399-417, https://doi.org/10.1080/095006900289813 (accessed 19 January 2022).
MLA Format
Taber, Keith. "Multiple Frameworks?: Evidence of manifold conceptions in individual cognitive structure." Int. J. Sci. Educ. 22.4 (2000): 399-417. 19 Jan. 2022 <https://doi.org/10.1080/095006900289813>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Keith Taber", Title = {Multiple Frameworks?: Evidence of manifold conceptions in individual cognitive structure}, Journal = {Int. J. Sci. Educ.}, Volume = {22}, Number = {4}, Pages = {399-417}, Month = {April}, Year = {2000} }
Refer Export Format

%A Keith Taber %T Multiple Frameworks?: Evidence of manifold conceptions in individual cognitive structure %J Int. J. Sci. Educ. %V 22 %N 4 %D April 1, 2000 %P 399-417 %U https://doi.org/10.1080/095006900289813 %O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article %A Taber, Keith %D April 1, 2000 %T Multiple Frameworks?: Evidence of manifold conceptions in individual cognitive structure %J Int. J. Sci. Educ. %V 22 %N 4 %P 399-417 %8 April 1, 2000 %U https://doi.org/10.1080/095006900289813


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