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Abstract Title: Video Analysis of Student Thinking in Labs
Abstract: Labs are an important component of learning physics. They can provide students with hands-on experiences to help them learn experimental methods and/or empirical ways of thinking. Many instructors are shifting away from traditional overly-structured, verification labs, focusing instead on supporting students in taking up more agency during experimentation. But little is known about how students develop the various skills or engage with these more open-ended activities. How do students learn to design their own experiments? How do students learn to quantitatively assess whether their data answer their question, or support their hypothesis? How do students work together productively in groups to accomplish the goals of lab? What barriers to participation exist in lab, and how can they be addressed?

Video analysis of student interactions during lab can be a powerful research tool to address these questions by uncovering the processes by which student groups learn to think critically together. In this workshop, various research teams who are currently analyzing video data of students in lab will each present a video clip for collaborative analysis. Participants will break into small groups to collectively view and discuss the clips. A subsequent whole-group discussion will synthesize lessons learned about specific student interactions as well as insights into the process of conducting video analysis of student thinking in physics labs. This workshop will highlight innovative approaches to researching students' thinking in reformed labs. It will also provide participants with opportunities to learn about video analysis methods through conducting some preliminary analyses and discussing the process.
Abstract Type: Workshop
Session Time: Parallel Sessions Cluster II
Room: Cascade E

Author/Organizer Information

Primary Contact: Luke Conlin
Salem State University
Co-Author(s)
and Co-Presenter(s)
Natasha Holmes, Emily Smith, Anna Phillips, Diana Sachmpazidi, Katie Ansell